This post was published as part of the symfony 2008 advent calendar. As this tutorial might have been updated since then, you are advised to read the last version from the symfony 1.2 documentation (for Propel or Doctrine).

Previously on Jobeet

Yesterday was a great day. You learned how to create pretty URLs and how to use the symfony framework to automate a lot of things for you.

Today, we will enhance the Jobeet website by tweaking the code here and there. In the process, you will learn more about all the features we have introduced this week.

The Propel Criteria Object

From day 2 requirements:

"When a user comes to the Jobeet website, she sees a list of active jobs."

But as of now, all jobs are displayed, whether they are active or not:

class jobActions extends sfActions
{
  public function executeIndex(sfWebRequest $request)
  {
    $this->jobs = JobeetJobPeer::doSelect(new Criteria());
  }
 
  // ...
}
 

An active job is one that was posted less than 30 days ago. The doSelect() method takes a Criteria object that describes the request to make to the database. In the code above, an empty Criteria is passed, which means that all the records are retrieved from the database.

Let's change it to only select active jobs:

public function executeIndex(sfWebRequest $request)
{
  $criteria = new Criteria();
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::CREATED_AT, time() - 86400 * 30, Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
 
  $this->jobs = JobeetJobPeer::doSelect($criteria);
}
 

The Criteria::add() method adds a WHERE clause to the generated SQL. Here, we restrict the criteria to only select jobs that are no older than 30 days. This method has a lot of different comparison operators; here are the most common ones:

  • Criteria::EQUAL
  • Criteria::NOT_EQUAL
  • Criteria::GREATER_THAN, Criteria::GREATER_EQUAL
  • Criteria::LESS_THAN, Criteria::LESS_EQUAL
  • Criteria::LIKE, Criteria::NOT_LIKE
  • Criteria::CUSTOM
  • Criteria::IN, Criteria::NOT_IN
  • Criteria::ISNULL, Criteria::ISNOTNULL
  • Criteria::CURRENT_DATE, Criteria::CURRENT_TIME, Criteria::CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Debugging Propel generated SQL

As you don't write the SQL statements by hand, Propel will take care of the differences between database engines and will generate SQL statements optimized for the database engine you choose during day 3. But sometimes, it is of great help to see the SQL generated by Propel; for instance, to debug a Criteria that does not work as expected. In the dev environment, symfony logs these queries (along with much more) in the log/ directory. There is one log file for every combination of an application and an environment. The file we are looking for is named frontend_dev.log:

# log/frontend_dev.log
Dec 6 15:47:12 symfony [debug] {sfPropelLogger} exec: SET NAMES 'utf8'
Dec 6 15:47:12 symfony [debug] {sfPropelLogger} prepare: SELECT jobeet_job.ID, jobeet_job.CATEGORY_ID, jobeet_job.TYPE, jobeet_job.COMPANY, jobeet_job.LOGO, jobeet_job.URL, jobeet_job.POSITION, jobeet_job.LOCATION, jobeet_job.DESCRIPTION, jobeet_job.HOW_TO_APPLY, jobeet_job.TOKEN, jobeet_job.IS_PUBLIC, jobeet_job.CREATED_AT, jobeet_job.UPDATED_AT FROM `jobeet_job` WHERE jobeet_job.CREATED_AT>:p1
Dec 6 15:47:12 symfony [debug] {sfPropelLogger} Binding '2008-11-06 15:47:12' at position :p1 w/ PDO type PDO::PARAM_STR

You can see for yourself that Propel has generated a where clause for the created_at column (WHERE jobeet_job.CREATED_AT > :p1).

The :p1 string in the query indicates that Propel generates prepared statements. The actual value of :p1 ('2008-11-06 15:47:12' in the example above) is passed during the execution of the query and properly escaped by the database engine. The use of prepared statements dramatically reduces your exposure to SQL injection attacks.

This is good, but it's a bit annoying to have to switch between the browser, the IDE, and the log file every time you need to test a change. Thanks to the symfony web debug toolbar, all the information you need is also available within the comfort of your browser:

SQL statements in the web debug toolbar

Object Serialization

Even if the above code works, it is not the way to go. As our day 2 requirements state:

"A user can come back to re-activate or extend the validity of the job ad for an extra 30 days..."

This is not possible with the above code, as the created_at value should not be changed once the record is created.

If you remember the database schema, we have an expires_at column. Currently this value is always empty. When a job is created, it must be set to 30 days after the current date. To do something before a Propel object is serialized to the database, you can override the save() method:

// lib/model/JobeetJob.php
class JobeetJob extends BaseJobeetJob
{
  public function save(PropelPDO $con = null)
  {
    if ($this->isNew() && !$this->getExpiresAt())
    {
      $now = $this->getCreatedAt() ? $this->getCreatedAt('U') : time();
      $this->setExpiresAt($now + 86400 * 30);
    }
 
    return parent::save($con);
  }
 
  // ...
}
 

The isNew() method returns true when the object has not been serialized yet in the database, and false otherwise.

Let's change the action to use the expires_at column:

public function executeIndex(sfWebRequest $request)
{
  $criteria = new Criteria();
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
 
  $this->jobs = JobeetJobPeer::doSelect($criteria);
}
 

We restrict the criteria to only select jobs with the expires_at date in the future.

More with Fixtures

Refreshing the Jobeet homepage in your browser won't change anything as the jobs in the database have been posted just a few days ago. Let's change the fixtures to add a job that is already expired:

# data/fixtures/020_jobs.yml
JobeetJob:
  # other jobs
 
  expired_job:
    category_id:  programming
    company:      Sensio Labs
    position:     Web Developer
    location:     Paris, France
    description:  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit.
    how_to_apply: Send your resume to lorem.ipsum [at] dolor.sit
    is_public:    true
    is_activated: true
    created_at:   2005-12-01
    token:        job_expired
    email:        job@example.com
 

Even if the created_at column is automatically filled by Propel, you can override it. Reload the fixtures and refresh your browser to ensure that the old job does not show up:

$ php symfony propel:data-load

Custom Configuration

In the JobeetJob::save() method, we have hardcoded the number of days for the job to become inactive. It would have been better to make the 30 days configurable. The symfony framework provides a built-in configuration file for application specific settings, the app.yml file. This YAML file can contain any setting you want:

# apps/frontend/config/app.yml
all:
  active_days: 30
 

In the application, these settings are available through the global sfConfig class:

sfConfig::get('app_active_days')
 

The setting has been prefixed by app_ because the sfConfig class also provides access to symfony settings as we will see later on.

Let's update the code to take this new setting into account:

public function save(PropelPDO $con = null)
{
  if ($this->isNew() && !$this->getExpiresAt())
  {
    $now = $this->getCreatedAt() ? $this->getCreatedAt('U') : time();
    $this->setExpiresAt($now + 86400 * sfConfig::get('app_active_days'));
  }
 
  return parent::save($con);
}
 

The app.yml configuration file is a great way to centralize global settings for your application.

Refactoring

Although the code we have written works fine, it's not quite right yet. Can you spot the problem?

The Criteria code does not belong to the action, it belongs to the Model layer. As the code returns jobs, let's create a method in the JobeetJobPeer class:

// lib/model/JobeetJobPeer.php
class JobeetJobPeer extends BaseJobeetJobPeer
{
  static public function getActiveJobs()
  {
    $criteria = new Criteria();
    $criteria->add(self::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
 
    return self::doSelect($criteria);
  }
}
 

Notice that the method is static. The action code can now use this new method:

public function executeIndex(sfWebRequest $request)
{
  $this->jobs = JobeetJobPeer::getActiveJobs();
}
 

This refactoring has several benefits over the previous code:

  • The logic to get the active jobs is now in the Model, where it belongs
  • The code in the controller is much more readable
  • The getActiveJobs() method is re-usable (for instance in another action)
  • The model code is now unit testable

Let's sort the jobs by the expires_at column:

static public function getActiveJobs()
{
  $criteria = new Criteria();
  $criteria->add(self::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
  $criteria->addDescendingOrderByColumn(self::EXPIRES_AT);
 
  return self::doSelect($criteria);
}
 

The addDescendingOrderByColumn() method adds an ORDER BY clause to the generated SQL (addAscendingOrderByColumn() also exists).

Categories on the Homepage

From day 2 requirements:

"The jobs are sorted by category and then by publication date (newer jobs first)."

Until now, we have not taken the job category into account. From the requirements, the homepage must display jobs by category. First, we need to get all categories with at least one active job. Open the JobeetCategoryPeer class and add a getWithJobs() method:

// lib/model/JobeetCategoryPeer.php
class JobeetCategoryPeer extends BaseJobeetCategoryPeer
{
  static public function getWithJobs()
  {
    $criteria = new Criteria();
    $criteria->addJoin(self::ID, JobeetJobPeer::CATEGORY_ID);
    $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
    $criteria->setDistinct();
 
    return self::doSelect($criteria);
  }
}
 

The Criteria::addJoin() method adds a JOIN clause to the generated SQL. By default, the join condition is added to the WHERE clause. You can also change the join operator by adding a third argument (Criteria::LEFT_JOIN, Criteria::RIGHT_JOIN, and Criteria::INNER_JOIN).

Change the index action accordingly:

// apps/frontend/modules/job/actions/actions.class.php
public function executeIndex(sfWebRequest $request)
{
  $this->categories = JobeetCategoryPeer::getWithJobs();
}
 

In the template, we need to iterate through all categories and display the active jobs:

// apps/frontend/modules/job/indexSuccess.php
<?php use_stylesheet('jobs.css') ?>
 
<div id="jobs">
  <?php foreach ($categories as $category): ?>
    <div class="category_<?php echo Jobeet::slugify($category->getName()) ?>">
      <div class="category">
        <div class="feed">
          <a href="">RSS feed</a>
        </div>
        <h1><?php echo $category ?></h1>
      </div>
 
      <table class="jobs">
        <?php foreach ($category->getActiveJobs() as $i => $job): ?>
          <tr class="<?php echo fmod($i, 2) ? 'even' : 'odd' ?>">
            <td><?php echo $job->getLocation() ?></td>
            <td><?php echo link_to($job->getPosition(), 'job_show_user', $job) ?></td>
            <td><?php echo $job->getCompany() ?></td>
          </tr>
        <?php endforeach; ?>
      </table>
    </div>
  <?php endforeach; ?>
</div>
 

To display the category name in the template, we have used echo $category. Does this sound weird? $category is an object, how can echo magically display the category name? The answer was given during day 3 when we have defined the magic __toString() method for all the model classes.

For this to work, we need to add the getActiveJobs() method to the JobeetCategory class:

// lib/model/JobeetCategory.php
public function getActiveJobs()
{
  $criteria = new Criteria();
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::CATEGORY_ID, $this->getId());
 
  return JobeetJobPeer::getActiveJobs($criteria);
}
 

In the add() call, we have omitted the third argument as Criteria::EQUAL is the default value.

When calling the JobeetJobPeer::getActiveJobs(), we need to pass the current Criteria object. So, the getActiveJobs() needs to merge it with its own criteria. As the Criteria is an object, this is quite simple:

// lib/model/JobeetJobPeer.php
static public function getActiveJobs(Criteria $criteria = null)
{
  if (is_null($criteria))
  {
    $criteria = new Criteria();
  }
 
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
  $criteria->addDescendingOrderByColumn(self::EXPIRES_AT);
 
  return self::doSelect($criteria);
}
 

Limit the Results

There is still one requirement to implement for the homepage job list:

"For each category, the list only shows the first 10 jobs and a link allows to list all the jobs for a given category."

That's simple enough to add to the getActiveJobs() method:

// lib/model/JobeetCategory.php
public function getActiveJobs($max = 10)
{
  $criteria = new Criteria();
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::CATEGORY_ID, $this->getId());
  $criteria->setLimit($max);
 
  return JobeetJobPeer::getActiveJobs($criteria);
}
 

The appropriate LIMIT clause is now hard-coded into the Model, but it is better for this value to be configurable. Change the template to pass a maximum number of jobs set in app.yml:

<?php foreach ($category->getActiveJobs(sfConfig::get('app_max_jobs_on_homepage')) as $i => $job): ?>
 

and add a new setting in app.yml:

all:
  active_days:          30
  max_jobs_on_homepage: 10
 

Dynamic Fixtures

Unless you lower the max_jobs_on_homepage setting to one, you won't see any difference. We need to add a bunch of jobs to the fixtures. So, you can copy and paste an existing job ten or twenty times by hand... but there's a better way. Duplication is bad, even in fixture files.

symfony to the rescue! YAML files in symfony can contain PHP code that will be evaluated just before the parsing of the file. Edit the 020_jobs.yml fixtures file and add the following code at the end:

JobeetJob:
# Starts at the beginning of the line (no whitespace before)
<?php for ($i = 100; $i <= 130; $i++): ?>
  job_<?php echo $i ?>:
    category_id:  programming
    company:      Company <?php echo $i."\n" ?>
    position:     Web Developer
    location:     Paris, France
    description:  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit.
    how_to_apply: |
      Send your resume to lorem.ipsum [at] company_<?php echo $i ?>.sit
    is_public:    true
    is_activated: true
    token:        job_<?php echo $i."\n" ?>
    email:        job@example.com
 
<?php endfor; ?>
 

Be careful, the YAML parser won't like you if you mess up with indentation. Keep in mind the following simple tips when adding PHP code to a YAML file:

  • The <?php ?> statements must always start the line or be embedded in a value.
  • If a <?php ?> statement ends a line, you need to explicly output a new line ("\n").

Secure the Job Page

When a job expires, even if you know the URL, it must not be possible to access it anymore. Try the URL for the expired job (replace the id with the actual id in your database):

/frontend_dev.php/job/sensio-labs/paris-france/4/web-developer-expired

Instead of displaying the job, we need to forward the user to a 404 page. But how can we do this as the job is retrieved automatically by the route?

By default, the sfPropelRoute uses the standard doSelectOne() method to retrieve the object, but you can change it by providing a method_for_criteria option in the route configuration:

# apps/frontend/config/routing.yml
job_show_user:
  url:     /job/:company_slug/:location_slug/:id/:position_slug
  class:   sfPropelRoute
  options:
    model: JobeetJob
    type:  object
    method_for_criteria: doSelectActive
  param:   { module: job, action: show }
  requirements:
    id: \d+
 

The doSelectActive() method will receive the Criteria object built by the route:

// lib/model/JobeetJobPeer.php
static public function doSelectActive(Criteria $criteria)
{
  $criteria->add(JobeetJobPeer::EXPIRES_AT, time(), Criteria::GREATER_THAN);
 
  return self::doSelectOne($criteria);
}
 

Now, if you try to get an expired job, you will be forwarded to a 404 page.

Link to the Category Page

Now, let's add a link to the category page on the homepage and create the category page.

But, wait a minute. It's Saturday, the hour is not yet over and we haven't worked that much. So, you have plenty of free time and enough knowledge to implement this all by yourself! Let's make an exercise of it. Check back tomorrow for our implementation.

See you Tomorrow

Do work on an implementation on your local Jobeet project. Please, abuse the online API documentation and all the free documentation available on the symfony website to help you out. We'll see you again tomorrow with our take on this implementation.

Good luck!

As always, you can checkout the source code of Jobeet as of today:

http://svn.jobeet.org/tags/release_day_06/