Introduction to Parameters

WARNING: You are browsing the documentation for Symfony 2.1 which is not maintained anymore. Consider upgrading your projects to Symfony 3.3.
2.1 version
Unmaintained

Introduction to Parameters

You can define parameters in the service container which can then be used directly or as part of service definitions. This can help to separate out values that you will want to change more regularly.

Getting and Setting Container Parameters

Working with container parameters is straightforward using the container's accessor methods for parameters. You can check if a parameter has been defined in the container with:

1
$container->hasParameter('mailer.transport');

You can retrieve a parameter set in the container with:

1
$container->getParameter('mailer.transport');

and set a parameter in the container with:

1
$container->setParameter('mailer.transport', 'sendmail');

Note

You can only set a parameter before the container is compiled. To learn more about compiling the container see Compiling the Container.

Parameters in Configuration Files

You can also use the parameters section of a config file to set parameters:

  • YAML
    1
    2
    parameters:
        mailer.transport: sendmail
    
  • XML
    1
    2
    3
    <parameters>
        <parameter key="mailer.transport">sendmail</parameter>
    </parameters>
    
  • PHP
    1
    $container->setParameter('mailer.transport', 'sendmail');
    

As well as retrieving the parameter values directly from the container you can use them in the config files. You can refer to parameters elsewhere by surrounding them with percent (%) signs, e.g. %mailer.transport%. One use for this is to inject the values into your services. This allows you to configure different versions of services between applications or multiple services based on the same class but configured differently within a single application. You could inject the choice of mail transport into the Mailer class directly but by making it a parameter. This makes it easier to change rather than being tied up and hidden with the service definition:

  • YAML
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    parameters:
        mailer.transport: sendmail
    
    services:
        mailer:
            class:     Mailer
            arguments: ['%mailer.transport%']
    
  • XML
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    <parameters>
        <parameter key="mailer.transport">sendmail</parameter>
    </parameters>
    
    <services>
        <service id="mailer" class="Mailer">
            <argument>%mailer.transport%</argument>
        </service>
    </services>
    
  • PHP
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    use Symfony\Component\DependencyInjection\Reference;
    
    // ...
    $container->setParameter('mailer.transport', 'sendmail');
    $container
        ->register('mailer', 'Mailer')
        ->addArgument('%mailer.transport%');
    

If you were using this elsewhere as well, then you would only need to change the parameter value in one place if needed.

You can also use the parameters in the service definition, for example, making the class of a service a parameter:

  • YAML
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    parameters:
        mailer.transport: sendmail
        mailer.class: Mailer
    
    services:
        mailer:
            class:     '%mailer.class%'
            arguments: ['%mailer.transport%']
    
  • XML
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6
     7
     8
     9
    10
    11
    <parameters>
        <parameter key="mailer.transport">sendmail</parameter>
        <parameter key="mailer.class">Mailer</parameter>
    </parameters>
    
    <services>
        <service id="mailer" class="%mailer.class%">
            <argument>%mailer.transport%</argument>
        </service>
    
    </services>
    
  • PHP
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6
     7
     8
     9
    10
    11
    12
    use Symfony\Component\DependencyInjection\Reference;
    
    // ...
    $container->setParameter('mailer.transport', 'sendmail');
    $container->setParameter('mailer.class', 'Mailer');
    $container
        ->register('mailer', '%mailer.class%')
        ->addArgument('%mailer.transport%');
    
    $container
        ->register('newsletter_manager', 'NewsletterManager')
        ->addMethodCall('setMailer', array(new Reference('mailer')));
    

Note

The percent sign inside a parameter or argument, as part of the string, must be escaped with another percent sign:

  • YAML
    1
    arguments: ['http://symfony.com/?foo=%%s&bar=%%d']
    
  • XML
    1
    <argument type="string">http://symfony.com/?foo=%%s&bar=%%d</argument>
    
  • PHP
    1
    ->addArgument('http://symfony.com/?foo=%%s&bar=%%d');
    

Array Parameters

Parameters do not need to be flat strings, they can also be arrays. For the XML format, you need to use the type="collection" attribute for all parameters that are arrays.

  • YAML
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6
     7
     8
     9
    10
    11
    12
    13
    # app/config/config.yml
    parameters:
        my_mailer.gateways:
            - mail1
            - mail2
            - mail3
        my_multilang.language_fallback:
            en:
                - en
                - fr
            fr:
                - fr
                - en
    
  • XML
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6
     7
     8
     9
    10
    11
    12
    13
    14
    15
    16
    17
    18
    <!-- app/config/config.xml -->
    <parameters>
        <parameter key="my_mailer.gateways" type="collection">
            <parameter>mail1</parameter>
            <parameter>mail2</parameter>
            <parameter>mail3</parameter>
        </parameter>
        <parameter key="my_multilang.language_fallback" type="collection">
            <parameter key="en" type="collection">
                <parameter>en</parameter>
                <parameter>fr</parameter>
            </parameter>
            <parameter key="fr" type="collection">
                <parameter>fr</parameter>
                <parameter>en</parameter>
            </parameter>
        </parameter>
    </parameters>
    
  • PHP
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    // app/config/config.php
    use Symfony\Component\DependencyInjection\Definition;
    
    $container->setParameter('my_mailer.gateways', array('mail1', 'mail2', 'mail3'));
    $container->setParameter('my_multilang.language_fallback', array(
        'en' => array('en', 'fr'),
        'fr' => array('fr', 'en'),
    ));
    

Constants as Parameters

The container also has support for setting PHP constants as parameters. To take advantage of this feature, map the name of your constant to a parameter key, and define the type as constant.

  • XML
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6
     7
     8
     9
    10
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    
    <container xmlns="http://symfony.com/schema/dic/services"
        xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
    
        <parameters>
            <parameter key="global.constant.value" type="constant">GLOBAL_CONSTANT</parameter>
            <parameter key="my_class.constant.value" type="constant">My_Class::CONSTANT_NAME</parameter>
        </parameters>
    </container>
    
  • PHP
    1
    2
    $container->setParameter('global.constant.value', GLOBAL_CONSTANT);
    $container->setParameter('my_class.constant.value', My_Class::CONSTANT_NAME);
    

Note

This does not works for Yaml configuration. If you're using Yaml, you can import an XML file to take advantage of this functionality:

  • YAML
    1
    2
    3
    # app/config/config.yml
    imports:
        - { resource: parameters.xml }
    

This work, including the code samples, is licensed under a Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license.